Thursday, 17 May 2018

Impact of tourism on Iceland's landscape

An interesting website which explores the growing pressures on Iceland. It's written by Ellis Quinn, who writes on the Eye on the Arctic website.

When most people think of Arctic economic development, things like resource extraction are usually first to mind. But northern regions and chambers of commerce are increasingly touting tourism as a key economic tool.

It’s seen as an industry that creates jobs for a variety of education levels, promotes small-scale entrepreneurship, reinforces and promotes local cultures, and creates the sustainable development lacking in many of the expensive and hard-to-get-to regions of the North; whether the remote Indigenous communities of Arctic Canada and Greenland, or the villages of Finnish Lapland and northern Russia.

But tourism is far from the benign industry it’s often made out to be.

As Iceland has discovered, mass tourism in the North can have social and environmental impacts as profound as those of the mining or drilling industries.

Yet successive governments did nothing to prepare for any of it. Instead, Instagram and Justin Bieber inadvertently ended up doing most of Iceland’s tourism planning for them.

Now, not everyone is sure they’re happy with the results.

Thursday, 10 May 2018

Happisburgh Coastal Erosion

One of a new series of BBC Teach videos.

Monday, 30 April 2018

Flooding Resources from the GA

Flooding is an issue which features at KS3, GCSE and 'A' level, and the GA have just added a new section of resources written in association with the Environment Agency. 

Here are the 9 sections that are included in the materials.


 You can also see a range of VIMEO films, such as this one of Gerd Masselink, and some case study links on a related area of the website.

Lovely work.

Sunday, 29 April 2018

The importance of reading Ernest

I've recently been reading Issue 7 of Ernest magazine.

It's coordinated by Jo Tinsley.
She has edited a fantastic magazine, and if you check the website you can also order some past issues for the same cost as the present one.
All of them offer a range of photography, and articles of varying lengths which explore ideas around place.

The standout elements of Issue 7 were the sections on East Anglia, with plenty of familiar places which I know very well, including Snettisham, where I lived for 12 years, and also down into Suffolk. There were explorations on the coastal marshes off Wells-next-the-Sea and also along the Blakeney area.

There were also some excellent photos, and a fascinating piece on a map of Antarctic Women, produced by Carol Devine, which fits very well with some of the work we did on Polar regions, and in the week when the expedition led by Felicity Aston which I have been following and producing some materials for (although shamefully slowly) reached the North Pole successfully.

For more on the Polar map of women and Carol's other projects (including an art project on marine litter in Svalbard called Aquamess, which is just the sort of thing I love to see taking place - I've shared and connected with a range of similar projects over the years), visit Carol's website.



Map copyright Carol Devine (2018)
http://www.caroldevine.info/ 

I shall be ordering some back copies of other issues, as they all look like they will be fascinating reading.

Saturday, 10 March 2018

Share your special places

This is the 125th Anniversary year of the Geographical Association, and the conference in Sheffield in April will be very special.

One of the projects I'm doing (and have been doing for some time) is to tweet out a 'top tip' a day for 125 days on the GA Secondary Phase committee twitter feed. This is coming to a climax on the first day of the conference.

As part of the plans for the GA's celebrations, and connecting with my OS GetOutside Champions Role for 2018, I'm going to start collating a list of 125 inspirational places to visit in the UK.

We all have places from which we draw inspiration... This could be a beach, a particular walk, a historic building, a bench overlooking a viewpoint, a landscape feature or something more esoteric. 

The reasons behind the inspiration may relate to family members, an emotional reunion, or sad passing; they may be places that are visited often, or which left a lasting impression from a single visit. They may be places we remember fondly from childhood, or which we discovered later in life.

This project is connected to the 125th Anniversary of the Geographical Association in 2018. One of the projects which the association wants to develop is a list of 125 Inspirational Places to visit in the UK: human and physical landscapes and locations which sum up the best the UK has to offer.

The project also links to work being done by Alan Parkinson as an Ordnance Survey GetOutside Champion during 2018, and the production of a list with further guidance on visiting the places on it will be a project for Alan to complete.

There is also a joint project underway between Alan Parkinson, and Peter Knight of Keele University, who are working to produce a resource for teachers exploring Inspirational Landscapes and Changing Places at https://aparkinson51.wixsite.com/inspirationalplaces 

Here's an example for you:
Surprise View, in the Peak District
A bend in the road where the Hope Valley, Hathersage and Castleton and Mam Tor beyond suddenly come into view spread out below you - the light varies throughout the year, but the view is always exciting - one of the best in the UK
Be careful when driving! Park up and take in the view

OS Grid Reference: SK249800

I've produced a Google form which you can link to here, and help me out with if possible. Feel free to share the link to the form as well.

Protecting nature

This tweet from the writer Melissa Harrison, of whom I'm a great fan, struck a chord earlier as I was flitting from one project and deadline to the next to keep the plates spinning, and thinking about some writing I have pencilled in for the Easter holidays.


Norfolk coast fieldtrip

Earlier in the week, it was out to the Norfolk Coast to explore the area around Sheringham and Overstrand.
We followed the River Glaven along parts of its route, and then headed for the coast at Overstrand to see an active slump and the measures in place to stop it happening.
Here's a few of the images I took which I quite like - click for biggery


Images: Alan Parkinson - shared under CC license